By

Colleen Theresa Brown

02 July 2015

Connecticut Amends Breach Notification Law Regarding Timing and Credit Monitoring; Imposes New Data Security Requirements on Health Insurers and State Contractors

New legislation out of Hartford means that Connecticut joins Massachusetts in imposing strict state requirements for data protection.  S.B. 949. Additionally, the new law amends Connecticut’s data breach notification law, making Connecticut the first in the nation to affirmatively require entities that experience a reportable data breach to offer free credit monitoring to residents affected by the breach. The legislation further imposes significant new requirements on health insurers, as well as contractors that receive confidential information from state agencies, to maintain minimum data security protections. While health insurers have until 2017 to come into full compliance, the requirements for state contractors are effective as of July 1, 2015.

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18 June 2015

Privacy advocates abandon Commerce Department multistakeholder process on facial recognition technology code of conduct

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (“NTIA”), housed within the U.S. Commerce Department, has been facilitating a multistakeholder process to develop privacy safeguards for the commercial use of facial recognition technology since December of 2013—with the first in person meeting held in February 2014.  NTIA seeks to create a voluntary, enforceable code of conduct applying the administration’s privacy framework, including its proposed Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights, to facial recognition technology in a commercial context.   After a little over a year in talks, and shortly after the NTIA’s 12th meeting, the process has broken down.  On Monday, June 15, a joint statement signed by representatives of multiple privacy advocacy groups, including the Center for Democracy and Technology, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Consumer Watchdog and the ACLU, declared that they “have decided to withdraw from further negotiations” because the process has been unable to elicit agreement “on any concrete scenario where companies should employ facial recognition only with a consumer’s permission.”  The joint statement further argues that “[t]he position that companies never need to ask permission to use biometric identification is at odds with consumer expectations, current industry practices, as well as existing state law.”

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26 May 2015

Identifying the Standards: DOJ, SEC and FTC Offer Guidance for Cybersecurity Preparedness

Although a frequent topic of discussion on Capitol Hill, no single standard for private-sector cybersecurity programs has yet to emerge. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Cybersecurity Framework is often considered foremost among existing guidance, but several other agencies are also expressing views, including the following recent guidance from the Department of Justice (DOJ), the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Significantly, both the DOJ and FTC tout the advantages of cooperating with law enforcement after a data breach by noting that such cooperation may lead to “regulatory” benefits.

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