Category

California

16 August 2018

Coalition Groups Weigh In on CCPA Clean Up Legislation

On June 29, the day after California Governor Jerry Brown signed the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) into law, Data Matters provided a summary of the important new legislation.  In doing so, we noted that the law was scheduled to go into effect on January 1, 2020 and that, if and when it did, it would be the “broadest privacy law in the United States” and “may well have an outsize influence on privacy laws nationwide.”  Because of this, we further predicted that “[t]he coming months will no doubt stimulate considerable legislative and litigation activity to test the acceptability of [the CCPA’s] effects on interstate commerce, free speech, commercial innovation, reasonable regulatory burdens and meaningful privacy protection.” (more…)

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16 July 2018

Privacy as a “Fundamental Right” Clouds Smart Regulation

*Originally Published July 12, 2018 by Chambers and Partners Data Protection & Cyber Security 2018

There is a lot going on with privacy around the world. As discussed in the chapters of this book, significant new laws are being adopted or taking effect, important judicial decisions are being decided to interpret existing legal requirements, and citizens are contending with their own expectations about confounding new technologies and business models. It is not clear, however, that the public policy being developed in any country is a thoughtful reaction to the promises and perils of today’s digital economy, rather than a knee-jerk over-reaction to imagined harms and a handful of high-profile incidents. (more…)

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29 June 2018

California Enacts Broad Privacy Laws Modeled on GDPR

On June 28, 2018, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (AB 375). According to the bill’s author, it was consciously designed to emulate the new European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that went into effect on May 25, and if and when it goes into effect, it would constitute the broadest privacy law in the United States. It is intended to give consumers more transparency regarding and control over their data and establishes highly detailed requirements for what companies that collect personal data about California residents must disclose.    (more…)

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12 October 2016

Lessons for California Business Over Recorded Phone Calls

*This article originally appeared in L.A. Biz at bizjournals.com on Oct. 11, 2016.

Over the past few months, Taylor Swift and Kanye West’s feud over a recorded phone call has put the California Invasion of Privacy Act (CIPA) in the spotlight.

Who can record a call? What type of consent is needed? These questions are not just fodder for celebrity tabloids but fundamentally important issues for companies recording customer service calls.

CIPA, codified in California’s Penal Code Section 630 et seq., is an invasion of privacy statute originally designed to restrict wire-tapping and the recording of calls snatched from the airways at the dawn of the wireless telephone industry.

However, in recent years, plaintiffs’ lawyers have embraced Section 632.7 of the Act as a sword to attack companies that record customer service calls.

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15 March 2016

California Data Breach Report Gets Specific on “Reasonable” Information Security

This February, the California Attorney General released the “California Data Breach Report,” summarizing developments from 2012-2015.  Drawing from 657 reports filed with the California AG impacting 49 million records, the report is notable for its “recommendations.”  These recommendations are ostensibly non-binding guidance that may nonetheless serve as the basis for the AG’s understanding of what constitutes “reasonable” data security in future investigations and enforcement actions.

(more…)

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04 January 2016

California’s New Data Breach Notification Requirements Effective January 1, 2016

When the California legislature closed out their 2015 session on September 11 of 2015, they sent three bills to Governor Jerry Brown proposing amendments to the state’s data breach laws which were all signed into law on October 6 and took effect January 1, 2016. The new laws address what license plate data automated readers may collect, defined encryption, and critically, made significant changes to the details of the required content and format of data breach notifications.  S.B. 570 specified that data breach notices must be titled “Notice of Data Breach” and be broken into sections titled “What Happened,” “What Information Was Involved,” “What We Are Doing,” “What You Can Do” and “For More Information.”  Notice formatting must be in at least 10-point font and call attention to the notice’s “nature and significance.” A model notification, which companies may use to comply with these content amendments, is also provided in the bill (see below). These formatting requirements would not be prohibited under other state breach notification laws, and so we will likely soon see this format become a de facto national standard for efficiency’s sake.

(more…)

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11 June 2014

Ninth Circuit Rules In Favor of Redbox Under Song-Beverly Credit Card Act

Consumer class actions under California’s Song-Beverly Credit Card Act have been shaped by significant case law developments over the last few years. Friday’s Ninth Circuit decision in Sinibaldi v. Redbox is a decisive victory for retailers of rented goods which will allow them wide latitude to collect personal information, such as zip codes, when using credit cards as a form of security.

(more…)

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