Category

Data Breaches

20 March 2015

Montana and Wyoming amend breach notification laws

Montana Governor Steve Bullock has signed a bill, H.B. 74, that will toughen the state’s breach notification law. The bill expands the definition of “personal information” covered by the law to include medical record information (as further defined by the state’s Insurance Information and Privacy Protection Act), taxpayer identification number, or other identification number issued by the Internal Revenue Service. The revised law also requires organizations to notify the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Office in the event of a breach. Insurance entities such as licensees or insurance support organizations must also provide notification to the state Insurance Commissioner. Notice to these regulators must identify the number of affected individuals, state the date and distribution method of the notice to affected individuals, and include a copy of the notice provided to individuals. The law takes effect October 1, 2015.

On March 2, Wyoming Governor Matt Mead signed a bill, S.F. 36, amending the state’s data breach notification law to revise the state’s definition of “personal information” and to specify the type of information required in notices to individuals. The amendment removes from the definition of “personal information” an individual’s demand deposit account, savings account, employee identification number, place of employment, and mother’s maiden name. At the same time, it adds new data elements to the definition, including taxpayer identification number, birth or marriage certificates, biometric data, medical history and health insurance information.  The new law also specifies that a notification letter to individuals affected by a breach must include the types of personal identifying information that were the subject of the breach, a general description of the breach, the approximate date of the breach, and the actions taken to protect the affected system from further breaches.

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25 April 2014

OCR Levies Nearly $2 Million in HIPAA Fines for Stolen Unencrypted Laptops

On Tuesday, April 22, 2014, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) announced that Concentra Health Services Inc. (“CHS”) and QCA Health Plan Inc. (“QCA”) have agreed to pay a total of $1,975,220, collectively, to resolve potential violations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”) Privacy and Security Rules stemming from the theft of unencrypted laptops. Specifically, CHS has agreed to pay $1,725,220, and QCA has agreed to pay $250,000, to OCR to settle potential HIPAA violations and will adopt corrective action plans to evidence their remediation of the potential violations. The clear message from both settlements is that OCR expects covered entities to encrypt mobile devices that store electronic Protected Health Information (“ePHI”).

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24 April 2014

Cybersecurity Developments: SEC, FINRA, NIST, DOJ/FTC

SEC Launches Cybersecurity Examination Initiative – Promoting Cyber Preparedness

On April 15, 2014 the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (OCIE) released a Risk Alert announcing that the agency will be examining 50 registered broker-dealers and investment advisers in order to assess cybersecurity preparedness in the securities industry.1 The announcement was accompanied by a sample request for information and documents. According to OCIE, the examinations will focus on “cybersecurity governance, identification and assessment of cybersecurity risks, protection of networks and information, risks associated with remote customer access and funds transfer requests, risks associated with vendors and other third parties, detection of unauthorized activity, and experiences with certain cybersecurity threats.”

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20 February 2014

Broker-Dealers Need to Respond to Recent Focus on Cybersecurity Threats

Recent data breaches at retailers like Target have increased awareness about growing cybersecurity threats. Broker-dealers in particular need to reevaluate their own cybersecurity preparedness in light of several recent events:

  1. FINRA’s launch of a cybersecurity sweep, publicly announced on the FINRA website on February 6, 2014;
  2. The inclusion of cybersecurity as a priority in the SEC’s National Examination Program for 2014 and FINRA’s 2014 Annual Regulatory and Examination Priorities Letter;
  3. The White House’s February 12, 2014 release of the much-anticipated Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity; and
  4. An upcoming SEC public roundtable on cybersecurity issues, to be held in Washington, DC on March 26, 2014.

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13 February 2014

White House Releases NIST Cybersecurity Framework

On February 12, the White House released the widely anticipated Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity (“the Framework”). Developed pursuant to Executive Order 13636 (issued in February 2013), the Framework strongly encourages companies across the financial, communications, chemical, transportation, healthcare, energy, water, defense, food, agriculture, and other critical infrastructure sectors to implement and comply with its voluntary standards. The provisions set forth in the Framework may establish a new baseline for industry standard practices, and may impact or guide FTC enforcement actions and plaintiff data breach lawsuits.

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22 October 2013

European Parliament votes on new EU Data Protection Regulation

The European Parliament’s Civil Liberties Committee (the “LIBE Committee”) has after several delays finally voted on the European Commission’s proposed EU Data Protection Regulation and adopted all amendments. The LIBE Committee also approved a mandate to start negotiations with the Council of Ministers (which represents EU Member States) and the Commission – the so called trilogue process. The Regulation was published by the European Commission in January 2012 and has been described as the most lobbied piece of European legislation in history receiving over 4,000 amendments in opinions from other Committees in the European Parliament as well as from numerous industries.

The Council of Ministers has also been very active and a compromise text containing amendments to the Proposed Regulation was published in June 2013. The LIBE Committee have during its vote urged the Council to finalize its position quickly. The race is now on to see if the European Commission, the European Parliament and Council of Ministers can agree the text of the proposed Regulation before the European Parliamentary elections in May of next year. The Proposed Regulation once adopted will have a significant impact on governments, businesses and individuals for the rest of this decade and beyond. Based on the latest amendments of the LIBE Committee the main elements of the proposed Regulation are summarized below.

Enforcement

In a surprise move the amount of the maximum fines for non compliance with the proposed Regulation has been dramatically increased, from the Commission’s proposed 2% of annual worldwide turnover, to 5% with an ability for individuals and any association, acting in the public interest, to bring claims for non compliance.

Scope of Regulation

The Regulation will apply to the processing of personal data in the context of the activities of a data controller or a processor in the EU and to a controller or processor not established in the EU, where the processing activities are related to (a) the offering of goods or services to EU citizens; or (b) the monitoring of such individuals. This means that most non EU companies that have EU customers will need to comply with the proposed Regulation once implemented.

One Stop Shop

The latest amendments provide for a new regulatory “one stop shop” so where a company operates in several EU countries the DPA where it is established will be the lead DPA which must consult with other DPAs before taking action which can be decided upon by the European Data Protection Board in the case of a dispute between DPAs.

Profiling

Significantly for online companies under the Regulation, every individual will now have a general right to object to profiling. In addition, the Regulation imposes a new requirement to inform individuals about the right to object to profiling in a “highly visible manner”. Profiling which does significantly affect the interests of an individual can only be carried out under limited circumstances such as with the individual’s consent and should not be automated but involve human assessment. These provisions if adopted could have a major impact on how online companies market their products and services.

Explicit Consent

Consent for processing personal data should be explicit with affirmative action required under the proposed Regulation. So the mere use of a service will not amount to consent. According to the proposal it should also be as easy to withdraw consent as to give it with consent being invalid where given for unspecified data processing. Processing data on children under 13 also requires the consent of the parent or legal guardian. The LIBE Committee also clarified that companies cannot make the execution of a contract or a provision of a service conditional upon the receipt of consent from users to process their data.

Standardized Information Policies

The proposed Regulation requires that certain standardized information should be provided to individuals in the form of symbols or icons similar to those used in the food industry. Individuals should also be informed about how their personal data will be processed and their rights of access to data, rectification and erasure of data and of the right to object to profiling as well as to lodge a complaint with a Data Protection Authority (“DPA”) and to bring legal proceedings.

Right of Erasure

In the latest amendments the “Right to be Forgotten” has been replaced by a “Right of Erasure” giving individuals a right to have their personal data erased where the data is no longer necessary or where they withdraw consent although certain exemptions also apply, such as where data is required for scientific research or for compliance with a legal obligation of EU law.

Accountability

Controllers will be required to adopt all reasonable steps to implement compliance procedures and policies that respect the choices of individuals which should be reviewed every 2 years. Importantly, controllers will need to implement privacy by design throughout the lifecycle of processing from collection of the data to its deletion. In addition, businesses will need to keep detailed documentation of the data being processed and carry out a privacy impact assessment where the processing presents specific risks such as use of health data or where the data involves more than 5,000 individuals with the assessment being reviewed every two years.

Data Protection Officers

Businesses with data on more than 5,000 people in any 12 month period or that process sensitive data, such as health data, will also need to appoint a data protection officer who should have extensive knowledge of data protection and who does not necessarily need to be an employee.

Security and Security Breaches

The controller and the processor will need to implement appropriate technical and organizational security measures. The proposal also requires that security policies contain a number of elements including, for example, a process for regularly testing, assessing and evaluating the effectiveness of security policies, procedures and plans put in place to ensure ongoing effectiveness. In addition, security breaches will need to be notified to DPAs without undue delay.

Data Transfers

In addition to Binding Corporate Rules and other data transfer solutions a new method allowing for international data transfers of personal data from the EU includes use of a “European Data Protection Seal” awarded by European DPAs for businesses and recipients that are audited for compliance with the Regulation. The latest amendments also re-introduce an important provision requiring that any requests for access to personal data by foreign authorities or courts outside the EU must be authorized by a DPA.

Health Data

The Regulation also has important provisions relating to use of health data including that processing of personal data for scientific research is only permitted with consent subject to exceptions by Member States where the scientific research serves a high public interest with the data either anonymized or pseudonymized under the highest technical standards with measures to prevent re-identification of individuals.

The proposed Regulation reflects the growing concern that governments, regulators and society has to data protection and privacy issues and should continue to be closely monitored as it moves closer to adoption which could take place over the next few months.

 


 

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22 October 2003

California’s Office of Privacy Protection Issues – Recommendations on Notification of Security Breaches Involving Personal Information

The recent release of new guidelines on responding to computer security breaches offer important guidance for all companies with valuable electronic information. On October 10, 2003, the Office of Privacy Protection within the State of California’s Department of Consumer Affairs issued its “Recommended Practices on Notification of Security Breach Involving Personal Information.” The Office of Privacy Protection is tasked with recommending policies and practices that protect California consumers’ privacy.

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