By

Clayton G. Northouse

28 September 2018

Senate Hearing on Federal Privacy Law: Question is Not Whether But What Form

On September 26, the Senate Commerce Committee invited tech and telecom companies to the Hill to discuss safeguards for consumer data privacy. “The question,” noted Chairman John Thune, “is no longer whether we need a federal law to protect consumers’ privacy. The question is what shape that law should take.” The Senators and testifying witnesses expressed strong support for a comprehensive federal privacy law. (more…)

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25 September 2018

Movement Towards a Comprehensive U.S. Federal Privacy Law: Witnesses Prepare to Testify in Senate Hearing

The last six months have been busy ones for privacy watchers, with the entry into force of the GDPR and the enactment and amendment of the California Consumer Privacy Act.

An increasing number of eyes are now turning to the U.S. Congress to see how it will react to these developments, and Data Matters – and the privacy community generally – will thus be closely watching the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on Wednesday, September 26, 2018, when it hosts a hearing titled “Examining Safeguards for Consumer Data Privacy.” (more…)

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02 March 2018

SEC Issues New Guidance on Cybersecurity Disclosure Requirements

On February 21, 2018, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission issued interpretive guidance (the Guidance) to assist public companies in drafting their cybersecuritydisclosures in SEC filings. See 83 FR 8166 (Feb. 26, 2018). In his public statement accompanying the issuance of this guidance, SEC Chairman Jay Clayton said he believed that “providing the Commission’s views on these matters will promote clearer and more robust disclosure by companies about cybersecurity risks and incidents, resulting in more complete information being available to investors.”1 In this new guidance, the SEC is likely intending to signal how it may focus future enforcement concerning the cybersecurity disclosure obligations of public companies, and their underlying disclosure controls, procedures and certifications. (more…)

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25 January 2018

Protecting Privilege in the Aftermath of a Data Breach

On Jan. 3, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit issued a decision that effectively required a company to turn over materials relating to a privileged forensic data breach investigation because, the court concluded, the company had implicitly waived privilege when it disclosed certain of the forensic firm’s conclusions in response to a discovery request. The Sixth Circuit’s decision emphasizes the need for caution by litigants wishing to raise a defense that relies on privileged investigations and reports, including third-party forensic reports, or otherwise disclosing the conclusions of such investigations and reports. (more…)

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02 January 2018

Privacy and Cybersecurity Top 10 for 2018

This past year was marked by ever more significant data breaches, growing cybersecurity regulatory requirements at the state and federal levels and continued challenges in harmonizing international privacy and cybersecurity regulations. We expect each of these trends to continue in 2018.

As we begin this New Year, here is list of the top 10 privacy and cybersecurity issues for 2018: (more…)

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23 August 2017

FTC Uber Settlement Mandates a Comprehensive Privacy Program, Sheds Light on “Reasonable Data Security” Expectations, and Underscores Importance of Insider Threat Prevention

On August 15, the FTC announced that it had reached an agreement with Uber to settle allegations that the company had made deceptive claims about its privacy and data security practices. The FTC’s settlement with Uber has important implications for privacy and data security measures that companies could take, and the representations they and their employees make in these areas. It also shed greater light on what the FTC means by “reasonable data security” measures that companies should implement, and underscores the importance of maintaining a robust insider threat prevention program. (more…)

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14 August 2017

State Privacy Laws: New Jersey Passes Consumer Privacy Act

State laws governing the collection and use of personal information continue to proliferate. The latest comes from New Jersey, which on July 21, 2017, signed into law legislation that restricts a merchant’s ability to collect personal data of shoppers and share such data with third parties.  New Jersey’s Personal Information Privacy and Protection Act permits retailers to scan an identification card only for certain purposes—such as verifying the consumer’s identity—and requires retailers to store such data securely.  Further, a retailer may not share the data with a third party unless the retailer discloses its data-sharing practices to the consumer. (more…)

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05 January 2017

NYDFS Revises Cybersecurity Regulations Incorporating Risk-Based Approach; Maintains Prescriptive Requirements and Certifications

On December 28, 2016, the New York State Department of Financial Services (the “NYDFS”) issued revised proposed regulations setting forth minimum requirements for NYDFS-regulated entities to address cybersecurity risk (“Revised Proposed Regulations”).  The NYDFS issued the Revised Proposed Regulations after considering feedback and criticism submitted during a 45-day comment period to address the initial proposal, issued on September 13, 2016.  The agency has announced an additional and final 30-day comment period from the date of publication to address new comments not previously raised in the original comment process.

(more…)

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27 December 2016

NYDFS to Delay New Financial Cybersecurity Rules

After having received over 150 comments on proposed cybersecurity regulations, the New York Department of Financial Services will delay implementation and initiate a new round of notice and comment on a further revised version of cybersecurity regulations. As we reported previously, NYDFS proposed new cybersecurity regulations for the financial sector in September of this year, and the comment period closed mid-November. NYDFS previously announced that the new rules would be effective January 1, 2017 and that covered entities would have 180 days to comply. Reuters reports that NYDFS will now publish a further revised version of proposed regulations on December 28 for public comment with a new effective date of March 1, 2017.

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