Category

Litigation

31 May 2019

GDPR: One Year On

The 25th of May, 2019 marked a year since the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) came into force. For most in privacy, involvement with the GDPR has been ongoing for well over this year, but on the first anniversary of the GDPR we take an opportunity to look back and reflect on where we are now in relation to some key areas of interest including enforcement action, privacy litigation, breach notification and developing guidance from the European Data Protection Board (“EDPB”).

(more…)

EmailShare
16 May 2019

California Privacy Law Will Likely Prompt Flood Of Class Actions

*This article first appeared in Law360 on May 15, 2019.

The California Consumer Privacy Act, known as the CCPA, is a new law set to go into effect on Jan. 1, 2020. The CCPA is the first U.S. law that will require businesses with an online presence in California to focus on user data and it regulates how businesses collect, share and use such data. One of the most significant risks to online business providers in California is that the CCPA provides for a private right of action for California consumers.

(more…)

EmailShare
13 May 2019

Terms and Conditions: Recent Supreme Court Decisions Highlight There is More to Consider than Just the Privacy Policy

Your website is essential to your online business.  By developing and presenting an online presence, however, you take on legal obligations to your users.  It is, therefore, a timely exercise to stop and take stock of your terms and conditions in light of recent developments in the law, consumer expectations, and your legal risk profile.  The privacy policy has been getting a lot of attention lately as many websites, services and apps are rushing to get their new privacy policies in place in light of the California Online Privacy Protection Act (“CalOPPA”).  But updating the privacy policy is only one step in protecting your business in this digital economy. Terms and conditions are an important tool for limiting a company’s exposure to the various legal risks inherent in conducting business online.   Boilerplate provisions can leave you exposed and frustrate your customers.  Companies should critically consider the nature and needs of the business and transactions that may occur on their websites to determine what types of provisions will be beneficial and best practices for creating a binding contract.

Terms and conditions generally specify the rules governing the use of a website or mobile application.  Since every website is different, custom-drafted terms and conditions are necessary to protect a particular business.  Well-crafted terms and conditions might address issues such as payment, taxes, refunds, gift certificates, accounts, disclaimers, user behavior on your site, warranties and limitations on liability.

(more…)

EmailShare
31 January 2019

In Landmark Case, Illinois Supreme Court Sets Low Bar For Claims Under Illinois’ Biometric Information Privacy Act

On January 25, 2019, the Illinois Supreme Court unanimously held that a plaintiff does not need to allege any actual injury or damages to successfully state a claim under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA). Rosenbach v. Six Flags Entertainment Corp., 2019 IL 123186 (Jan. 25, 2019) (a copy of the opinion is available here). A violation of the statute by itself is sufficient to state a claim, even if no breach or misuse of the biometric information or identifier has occurred. Because BIPA includes stiff liquidated damages for violations, the court’s ruling is likely to lead to renewed interest by the plaintiffs’ bar in class action suits alleging BIPA violations. (more…)

EmailShare
26 November 2018

The Fifth Edition of The Privacy, Data Protection and Cybersecurity Law Review is Available

The fifth edition of The Privacy, Data Protection and Cybersecurity Law Review takes a look at the evolving global privacy, data protection and cybersecurity landscape in a time when mega breaches are becoming more common, significant new data protection legislation is coming into effect, and businesses are coming under increased scrutiny from regulators, Boards of Directors and their customers. Several lawyers from Sidley’s global Privacy and Cybersecurity practice have contributed to this publication. (more…)

EmailShare
01 November 2018

Ohio Law Recognizes Safe Harbor in Data Breach Litigation

Companies with robust cybersecurity programs may still be vulnerable to attack. A new, first-of-its-kind law in Ohio now recognizes this fact. On November 1, 2018, the Ohio Data Protection Act (SB 220) establishes a safe harbor from state tort actions in data breach cases for entities that have developed an information security program with “administrative, technical, and physical safeguards for the protection of personal information and that reasonably conforms to an industry recognized cybersecurity framework.” Without establishing minimum cybersecurity standards, the Ohio law affords defendants an “affirmative defense” against state tort actions and establishes an important precedent that may serve as a model for other states and the federal government to follow. (more…)

EmailShare
10 October 2018

California and Preemption

As one of the epicenters of the Information Age and largest state in the Nation, California’s regulatory decisions can have an outsize impact on the data economy.  Recently, the State has tried to use this pride of place to stamp its imprint on two important public debates.  First, on September 30, 2018, Governor Brown signed into law the California Internet Consumer Protection and Net Neutrality Act of 2018 (Senate Bill 822), which seeks to impose, as a matter of state law, net neutrality regulation even more restrictive than the federal regime the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) repealed earlier this year.  Second, earlier this year, California enacted (and then subsequently amended) the California Consumer Privacy of 2018, the broadest privacy law in the United States.  As laid out below, these enactments have sparked legal and policy debates over whether California should be able to set rules that could become de facto national standards or whether federal rules do or should preempt California’s efforts.  (more…)

EmailShare
27 September 2018

Why it’s Unconstitutional for Politicians – Including the President – to Block People on Social Media

*This article first appeared in the Washington Post on September 26, 2018.

In a recent piece for Washington Post Outlook, Chris Fonzone and Josh Geltzer (from the Georgetown Law Center’s Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection) explained why a legal case that began with a dispute between a Loudoun County supervisor and a constituent may help set a new standard for online interaction nationally:

A legal case that began with a dispute between a member of the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors and a constituent may help to set the rules for how government officials — up to and including President Trump — interact with the public online. A federal appeals court in Richmond will hear the case this week, and, while the stakes of the conflict may seem small at first — one man was banned for a day from an official’s Facebook page — it has potentially enormous First Amendment implications. (more…)

EmailShare
20 September 2018

New York State Department of Financial Services Challenges OCC Authority on Fintech Charters

On July 31, 2018, the U.S. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) announced its decision (the Fintech Charter Decision) to begin accepting applications from financial technology (fintech) companies for special purpose national bank charters.1 The OCC has indicated it will not grant a charter to a fintech company that wishes to accept deposits or engage in fiduciary activities (for business plans that involve purely fiduciary activities, a limited purpose trust charter may provide an alternative vehicle). The Fintech Charter Decision is discussed in greater detail in a prior Sidley Banking and Financial Services Update.2

On September 14, the New York State Department of Financial Services (DFS) filed a federal court complaint seeking to enjoin further actions by the OCC to implement the Fintech Charter Decision and related actions, arguing that such acts are lawless, ill-conceived and destabilizing of financial markets. DFS also argued that such acts are beyond the OCC’s statutory authority and in violation of the Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, alleging that the police power to regulate financial services and products delivered within a state’s own geographical jurisdiction is among a state’s fundamental sovereign powers.3 (more…)

EmailShare
01 August 2018

New Case Sheds Further Light on the Definition of Autodialer under the TCPA

Ever since the D.C. Circuit struck down the FCC’s overbroad rule defining “auto-dialers” under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, district courts have debated the scope of the D.C. Circuit’s ruling: Did it effectively strike down earlier FCC pronouncements on what qualifies as an auto-dialer? In a carefully reasoned opinion, a district court judge in Chicago held last week that it did. (more…)

EmailShare
1 2 3 9
XSLT Plugin by BMI Calculator