Category

CCPA

16 July 2019

A Closer Look at California Privacy Law Bar on Two Contract Clauses

*This article first appeared in Law360 on July 8, 2019

In September of 2018, California passed a significant new consumer privacy law, the California Consumer Privacy Act, which is the first U.S. law to regulate how businesses with a presence in California collect, share, and use consumer data. The CCPA not only imposes significant compliance obligations on companies conducting business with California residents but also incentivizes class action litigation through both the CCPA’s private right of action and California’s Unfair Competition law.

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15 July 2019

Crunch Time in California – CCPA Amendments Hotly Debated and (Some) Defeated – Employee Data Is Back, Reasonable Definition of Personal Information Is Gone (For Now), and More!

With less than three months to go before amendments to California’s far reaching data privacy law need to be signed into law, the CCPA landscape may be changing yet again, as several amendments debated in the state Senate Judiciary Committee on July 9th underwent significant modifications.  Eight proposed CCPA amendments were on the committee’s agenda, and several were hotly debated in an hours-long session that extended late into the night.  In the end, two of the bills had substantive modifications, another was stalled, one was defeated, and the rest made it out of the committee, with limited changes. Here we summarize the highlights.

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20 June 2019

Maine’s Act to Protect the Privacy of Online Consumer Information

Since the passage of the California Consumer Privacy Act (Cal. Civ. Code §1798.100 et seq.) (“CCPA”), several states are following in California’s footsteps and adopting privacy bills that would allow consumers to object to the sale of their personal information.

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11 June 2019

The CCPA Ripple Effect: Nevada Passes Privacy Legislation

With about half a year to go until the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)’s effective date, and with significant amendments still percolating to define the scope and impact of the CCPA come 2020, other states continue to consider whether to adopt new and broader privacy laws of their own, with Nevada recently taking the distinction of being the first to follow the CCPA trend.  While the scope and obligations of the Nevada law is significantly narrower than the CCPA and thus largely will align with current CCPA implementation projects, the new Nevada law does expand upon the CCPA in one particularly notable way—it moves the deadline to facilitate opt-outs of sales of personal information up to October 2019. (more…)

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16 May 2019

California Privacy Law Will Likely Prompt Flood Of Class Actions

*This article first appeared in Law360 on May 15, 2019.

The California Consumer Privacy Act, known as the CCPA, is a new law set to go into effect on Jan. 1, 2020. The CCPA is the first U.S. law that will require businesses with an online presence in California to focus on user data and it regulates how businesses collect, share and use such data. One of the most significant risks to online business providers in California is that the CCPA provides for a private right of action for California consumers.

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02 May 2019

Washington State Comprehensive Privacy Bill Loses Steam, Data Breach Law Amendment Heads to Governor’s Desk

As the legislative session drew to a close, what once seemed like an inevitability suddenly looked unlikely.  The Washington Privacy Act, SB 5376/HB1854, failed to make its way through the legislative process.  The Bill’s sponsor, Sen. Reuven Carlyle, called the game on April 17, tweeting that despite the “unprecedented 46-1 vote” in the Senate, “[u]nfortunately, House failed to pass privacy legislation this year.  We’re committed to 2020.”  Nevertheless, the State of Washington did pass notable privacy legislation, albeit on a more narrow topic.

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26 March 2019

California, Here We Come: Getting Ready for the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018

WEBINAR
Wednesday, March 27, 2019 | 4:00 p.m. EDT / 1:00 p.m. PDT
CLE & CPE Credit Offered

When the California Consumer Privacy Act enters into force on January 1, 2020, it will grant consumers extensive new data rights and place a number of new obligations on companies – obligations that in some ways even exceed those imposed by the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This means that just about every company doing business in California or with Californians will need to take steps to comply with the CCPA, regardless of their GDPR status. Please join us for a discussion that identifies the key questions and issues companies should be considering before the CCPA enters into force on January 1, 2020. We’ll talk through the steps companies should take now to meet these new obligations.

SPEAKERS

  • Colleen Theresa Brown, Partner
  • Christopher C. Fonzone, Partner
  • Alan Charles Raul, Partner
  • Kate Heinzelman, Counsel
  • Sheri Porath Rockwell,Associate

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

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18 March 2019

The New Congress Turns to an Old Issue – The Possibility of Comprehensive Federal Privacy Legislation

Even a few short years ago, it seemed unlikely that Congress would enact comprehensive privacy legislation. But a series of high profile data breaches; increasing concerns about data practices, particularly when connected to political micro-targeting; fears about the rise of autonomous, and potentially invisible, decision-making; and the passage of far-reaching foreign and now State privacy laws have all changed the zeitgeist. Congress has taken notice, and, for the past year, Data Matters has been closely following the Legislative Branch’s moves as it a federal privacy bill looks more likely than it has in a generation. (more…)

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12 February 2019

Takeaways From CCPA Public Forums

When California Governor Jerry Brown signed the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) into law on June 28, 2018, there was broad agreement that revisions and clarifications were necessary.  The CCPA was written and enacted with extraordinary speed, as legislators felt the need to move quickly in order to preempt a data privacy ballot initiative that had received enough signatures to be placed on California’s November ballot.  Consequently, June 28 was, in many ways, the beginning of a debate over the specifics of the CCPA, rather than the end.  Indeed, the California legislature has already passed a “clean-up” bill to address concerns expressed about the CCPA, and heated debates over the meaning and merits of specific provisions continue.  (more…)

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