Category

Health Privacy

18 February 2021

European Medicines Agency Issues Updated Good Clinical Practice Q&A

On February 17, 2021 the European Medicines Agency (EMA) published an updated version of its good clinical practice questions and answers (GCP Q&A).  The updated section relates to access to patient medical records by GCP inspectors from European Economic Area (EEA) Member States.  It stresses the importance of sponsors conducting studies in countries outside the EEA obtaining the prior explicit consent of a clinical trial participant for the review of their medical records by EEA GCP inspectors.

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21 January 2021

A Digital Europe – Digital Health and other Recent EU Data Initiatives

Taking a step into the digital age, the European Commission announced that the 2020s shall become the EU’s Digital Decade.  The EU’s digitalization, including in the area of health, is one of the Commission’s key priorities and covers a wide range of actions and related initiatives.

Building on prior initiatives, in 2019 the Commission announced six key priorities (since supplemented by the COVID-19 recovery plan) that would shape the coming five years of policy making.  One of these six key priorities is to create a Europe fit for the digital age and work on a digital strategy that will empower people with a new generation of technologies.

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15 December 2020

HHS Issues Proposed Rule Modernizing HIPAA Privacy Rule

On December 10, 2020, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Civil Rights (OCR) released a proposed rule (the Proposed Rule) that would make a number of key changes to the Privacy Rule under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 and the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 (collectively, HIPAA).  HHS stated that the Proposed Rule is intended to reduce burdens that may limit or discourage care coordination and case management communications among individuals and HIPAA-covered entities while continuing to protect the privacy of individuals.  The proposed changes are designed to lead to increased data access, sharing, and portability and to further HHS’s emphasis on patients’ right of information access, which has been highlighted through a series of enforcement actions in 2020.  If enacted as proposed, the amendments would require healthcare providers and electronic health records (EHR) vendors to update policies and disclosures related to information access and perhaps even to redesign certain EHR processes.  Comments are due 60 days after publication in the Federal Register.

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10 November 2020

Mobile Technologies and COVID-19: A Primer on Privacy Considerations and Fighting the Virus with Cell Phones

Sidley associate Michael R. Roberts is the author of “Mobile Technologies and COVID-19: A Primer on Fighting the Virus with Cell Phones,” an article published in the Fall 2020 issue of Infrastructure, a quarterly publication of the American Bar Association’s Infrastructure and Regulated Industries Section.  The article was also featured on the American Bar Association’s website homepage.

The article provides a primer on key privacy considerations and issues in order to assist businesses considering whether to develop or use mobile technologies to fight COVID-19. It first outlines the main ways governments and businesses might use mobile technologies to fight the virus and the potential applicability of current laws to these uses. The article then details how those laws might change as legislatures and regulators address the novel privacy and civil liberties issues raised by COVID-19. Finally, the article offers a checklist to capture important data privacy and security legal considerations relevant to the use of mobile technologies to combat COVID-19.

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14 October 2020

California Amends Privacy Laws Again: CCPA Health Information Amendment and Employee/B2B Exemption Signed into Law; Vetoes for Genetic Privacy and Social Media Parental Consent Bills

California’s Governor Gavin Newsom recently signed into law two bills to amend the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”).  He also vetoed two other consumer privacy bills based on concerns about potential conflicts with existing state and federal law. Collectively, these four bills represented the most significant privacy legislation that came out of the California Legislature’s 2019-20 term, which came to a close on September 30th.

Only one of the two new CCPA amendments, AB713, includes substantive changes to the law.  It streamlines the CCPA’s health information exception and imposes new obligations on CCPA businesses and others that handle deidentified patient information.

The other CCPA amendment, AB1281, simply extends the CCPA’s employee and B2B exemptions to January 1, 2022 if voters fail to pass Proposition 24 (CPRA or CCPA 2.0) in November.  Those exemptions are currently set to expire on December 31st of this year.

Newsom also vetoed two consumer privacy bills despite expressing support for the goals of each.  SB980 would have expanded consumer rights with respect to genetic information collected by direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies.  Newsom’s veto was motivated by concerns that the law could have “unintended consequences” for the operation of the state’s communicable disease reporting requirements, including those applicable to COVID-19.  The other bill, AB1138, would have imposed additional parental consent requirements on social media network operators.  Newsom vetoed it to avoid potentially overlapping state and federal compliance obligations, citing parallels between the bill and federal regulations under the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (“COPPA”).

Here we outline the significant features of each of the new CCPA amendments.

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29 September 2020

An Early Recap of Privacy in 2020: A US Perspective

*This article was adapted from “Global Overview,” appearing in The Privacy, Data Protection and Cybersecurity Law Review (7th Ed. 2020)(Editor Alan Charles Raul), published by Law Business Research Ltd., and first published by the International Association of Privacy Professionals Privacy Perspectives series on September 28, 2020.

Privacy, like everything else in 2020, was dominated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Employers and governments have been required to consider privacy in adjusting workplace practices to account for who has a fever and other symptoms, who has traveled where, who has come into contact with whom, and what community members have tested positive or been exposed.

As a result of all this need for tracking and tracing, governments and citizens alike have recognized the inevitable trade-offs between exclusive focus on privacy versus exclusive focus on public health and safety.

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27 August 2020

OCR 2020 Settlements Target HIPAA Security Rule Non-Compliance

In almost the first three quarters of 2020, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) has settled three cases related to alleged violations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”), totaling $1,165,000.  These settlements underscore OCR’s continued focus on enforcement of the HIPAA Security Rule.

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13 August 2020

Digital Health and Cyber Risk in the “New Normal”

Sidley partnered with Aon’s Cyber Solutions for an exclusive webinar for life sciences organizations to address developments in digital health and cybersecurity in light of some key trends affecting the industry today.

The speakers discussed the latest in digital health and how to better understand and mitigate cyber risk, as well as protect life sciences organizations’ highly valuable and sensitive data.

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27 July 2020

SAMHSA Releases Final 42 CFR Part 2 Revised Rule

On July 13, the Department of Health and Human Services’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services (“SAMHSA”) announced final revisions to the Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder Patient Records regulation codified at 42 CFR Part 2 (so-called “Part 2” regulations).  These regulations—which apply to certain information relating to patients being treated for substance use disorders (“SUDs”)—impose restrictions above and beyond those in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”).  While the final rule does not fundamentally change the basic requirements of the Part 2 regulations, it relaxes some of the restrictions the regulations impose on holders of Part 2 information, in particular, to facilitate care coordination.

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15 June 2020

Who’s Balancing Privacy Against Public Health and Everything Else?

*Article first appeared in The Hill on June 13, 2020.

Concerns over the use of location tracking and contact tracing of infected individuals to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19 have once again placed “privacy” at the forefront of public attention. And even though Congress declared privacy to be a fundamental right in 1974, it established no cabinet office or institutional framework to focus on the role of data protection and digital technology in our society. Consequently, during these days of COVID-19, there is no senior government official responsible for taking account of and balancing the trade-offs between privacy and public health.

Click here to read in full.

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